Tag Archives: Formula One


Captain Nice, The Glen – 1974

Screen Shot 2016-03-28 at 4.16.19 PMMark Donohue came to racing as a college student at Brown University. In 1966, he teamed  with Roger Penske racing sports cars, wining the USRRC twice. He  raced Ford GT 40’s at Le Mans, won the Daytona and Sebring Endurance Races, the Indianapolis 500 in 1972, and the Trans Am series. Nicknamed Captain Nice due to his quiet demeanor, he retired from racing in 1973, but was lured back when Penske entered F1 in 1974. This photo is of Donahue in the Penske PC1 going uphill into the Esses at The Glen in 1974.


Jacky Ickx – USGP 1969

Screen Shot 2016-03-28 at 4.07.47 PMJacky Ickx is Belgium’s greatest driver, winning eight Grand Prix’s, coming second in the championship twice, winning six 24 Hours of LeMans, two World Sportscar Championships, one Can-AM championship, and the Dakar Rally. In Formula One he earned the nickname “Ringmeister” for his success at Germany’s famous Nurburgring. This photo is from 1969 USGP where he drove for Brabham in Formula One, on the old Chute section of the original Watkins Glen layout.


Lole – Zandvoort 1978

Screen Shot 2016-03-28 at 3.07.48 PMCarlos Reutemann was a great driver from the Argentine, winning 12 Grand Prix over an eleven year career and coming second in the World Championship in 1979, and third 3 times. In terms of wins, 1978 was his best year when he won 4 races including Long Beach and Watkins Glen in the Ferrari 312. Here at Zandvoort in 1978 he finished seventh. When he retired from racing he returned to Argintina where he became a successful statesman. Photo taken on old backstretch, by the sand dunes between turns 6 and 7.


James Hunt Long Beach – 1978

Screen Shot 2016-03-28 at 2.55.06 PMJames Hunt was the original wild and crazy guy, and a seriously talented driver. He came on the scene in 1973 driving for Lord Hesketh’s eccentric operation before moving to McLaren for the epic 1976 season, where he edge Lauda by a single point for the championship. He won three races in 1977, but by 1978 his career was on the wane. In Long Beach he smacked the wall and failed to finish. This photo was taken at La Gasomet hairpin with a 28mm lens, driver and photographer less then 10 feet apart – too cool for words.

 


Emo at The Glen – 1975

00007_n_ copy 2Emerson Fittipaldi was Brazil’s first World Champion winning in 1972 and 1974. He burst onto the scene in 1970 winning the USGP as a replacement for Jochen Rindt. The win clinched the title for Rindt denying the fast closing Jacky Ickx the points needed to overtake Rindt. In 1974 he switched to McLaren where he stayed until 1976 when he switched to his own car. Emo won both the CART and F1 Championships and won Indy twice. Here he leads Tom Pryce in the Shadow out of the Anvil at the 1975 USGP.


USGP Watkins Glen 1979

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Watkins Glen was nearing the end of its run when the race was held in 1979. The recession of the 1970’s coupled with bad behavior by some fans caused the track to fall from grace. By the time of the 1979 race, Jody Scheckter had cinched the championship for Ferrari. His teammate, Gilles Villeneuve of Canada would win at the Glen, in wet weather, with Rene Arnoux second and Didier Pironi third. The late 1970’s to early 1980’s saw some of the most competitive racing in F1 history with 11 different drivers winning races in 1982, a far cry from today’s follow the leader racing with only 2-3 winners per season.


2001 USGP Indianapolis

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After leaving Watkins Glen in 1980, the US Grand Prix wandered the countryside in search of a venue. Races were held in Detroit, Phoenix and Dallas, before settling on Indianapolis in 2000. Using most of the famous front straight the cars ran clockwise up to Turn Four were the exited for an infield road course that rejoined the famed oval between Turns One and Two. In 2001, Miki Hakkinen won the race driving for McLaren shown here following the Williams BMW of Juan Pablo Montoya.


Monaco 1968

The streDSC_0003ets of Monaco have been synonymous with Grand Prix racing since the first round the corners race in 1929. In 1967, the race pictured in the 1968 poster, Denny Hulme won the race on his way to the World Championship. Grand Prix racing was an eclectic affair in the 1960’s with manufacturers like Ferrari and Honda going against small privateers like Lotus, BRM and Brabham. Jack Brabham and his protege Hulme won consecutive championships in 1966 and 1967 – Brabham’s 1966 championships remain the only one with a driver winning in a car carrying his name. The 1968 race would be won by the King of Monaco, Graham Hill, who took top place 4 times in the decade.